Wednesday, October 03, 2018

Free Social Stories About No Hitting

A collection of free social stories about hitting others and why it's not okay, including some free printable social stories for kids.

Does your child hit others when they are angry, upset, or frustrated?

Does your child need a reminder that hands are not for hitting others?

Or maybe you are a teacher who has a child who's constantly hitting other students...

If yes, then these free social stories about no hitting are going to be super useful for you and your child. They explain why it's not okay to hit others and offer suggestions of what to do instead when upset or angry.

Free social stories about hitting and why it's not okay to hit, including no hitting free printable social stories

Free No Hitting Social Stories

The following social stories include some free printable social stories about not hitting others. Some of the stories are text only and are meant to be examples of ones you could write in case you choose to write your own social story. Also, please note that these stories focus solely on hitting and do not necessarily include kicking, biting, or similar aggressive behaviors.

Social Story for Hitting from Stephanie Harrington on Teachers Pay Teachers

Hitting Social Story from Beyond Words Speech and Language Therapy on Teachers Pay Teachers

Gentle Hands - No Hitting Social Story from Rachel M on Teachers Pay Teachers

I Can Have a Safe & Calm Body - Social Story About Unsafe Behaviors from The "Feelings Teacher" on Teachers Pay Teachers

Hitting Social Story Examples from Happy Learners

Free Video Social Stories About How It's Not Okay to Hit

If video social stories are more your thing, here are a few social stories that talk about why it's not okay to hit others. I hope you find them useful.






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Free social stories about hitting and why it's not okay to hit, including no hitting free printable social stories
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Monday, October 01, 2018

Free Social Stories About Getting a Haircut

A collection of free social stories about getting a haircut including some free printable social stories for kids.

Getting a hair cut is a big deal to kids with autism or sensory issues. Many families struggle to find a hair stylist who is understanding and patient. One who can understand the sensory sensitivities that go along with getting one's hair cut.

We personally cut our boys' home ourselves at home, but I remember how difficult those first few hair cuts were when J was a toddler and a preschooler. We would have to cut for a little bit, pause, and repeat over and over. It's a lot easier now, but there are still challenges we face when cutting his hair.

Repeating the steps over and over to J is helpful and tells him how much longer I will be cutting his hair for.

Basically, we are using a verbal social story these days with him. However, below you will find lots of free social stories about getting a haircut that will hopefully make the whole process easier for your child and your family.

Free printable haircut social stories for kids including a video social story about getting a haircut

Free Haircut Social Stories

Whether you want to write your own social story or you want to save time and print one, these free haircut social stories are a great starting point for helping your kids with getting their hair cut. These stories will walk your child through what to expect when getting a haircut, why they need to get a haircut, and what to do during a haircut. I hope you can find one that is helpful for your child!

I'm Getting a Haircut Social Story from Kids' Hair

Getting a Haircut Social Story for Special Education & Autism from Special Education and Autism Resources for You on Teachers Pay Teachers

Getting a Haircut Social Story from SpeechThink on Teachers Pay Teachers

Happy Haircuts Simplified Social Story from Your Kids OT

Example Text Only Haircut Social Story from Raising Children - There are lots of great tips here as well!

Video Social Story About Getting a Haircut

Would you prefer a video version of a haircut social story? Here's a great one to check out:


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Free printable haircut social stories for kids including a video social story about getting a haircut
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Friday, September 28, 2018

If Only Advocating Wasn't so Darn Exhausting & Uncomfortable...

Let's admit it, advocating for your child's needs is exhausting and uncomfortable and it's overwhelming knowing where to start when it comes to how to advocate for your child. Here's a personal advocacy story.

Advocacy tips for autism parents

"I will be looking into this..." he says.

Thank goodness it's just a telephone call, because I certainly cannot roll my eyes hard enough as he spits out that sentence in the most confident, almost cheerful, tone he can muster.

But I don't believe him.

Not one bit.

My husband, on the other hand, is hopeful that things are being looked into as promised.

But me?

I'm a bit more cautious. Pessimistic even.

I mean I've heard lines like this before and in the end, nothing really happens.

Maybe if my son was more aggressive or a flight risk, I wouldn't be where I am at the moment.

Maybe if my son had more behavior issues in the classroom, I wouldn't have to be making this phone call right now.

Maybe if my son had meltdowns at school every single morning like he did two years ago...

I could go on and one with these maybe ifs, but the reality is my son isn't aggressive or a flight risk or a problem kid. He's sweet and quiet. He works hard. He's smart and goofy. He's probably the first one done everything asked of him in his class.

But that doesn't mean he doesn't struggle.

He still deserves accommodations and supports to help him be successful at school.

I am afraid he is flying under the radar because he's "high functioning" - and don't even get me started on that term, but that's for another time, another day.

It's not okay for his needs to be pushed aside because of budget cuts, priority, and whatever other canned response gets tossed my way.

It's not okay that I am back at square one trying to advocate for his needs. He's only been an identified student at this school since Kindergarten and he's in grade four now.

It's not okay that I have to be that parent just to get things in motion year after year. The squeaky wheel gets the grease after all, right?

Honestly, it's exhausting.

My son's going to be advocating for himself one day and you know what?

I'm scared for him.

I'm scared for his future self that has to constantly battle the system.

I'm scared that he too will be constantly exhausted.

I'm scared that he will decide that the fight isn't worth the exhaustion or the frustration that comes along with advocating for his needs.

My sense of worry kicks in on this thought and is often the reminder I need to push through the uncomfortableness of it all.

Because yes, I need to be the jerk of a mom who is constantly on the school's case. The mom that teachers warn fellow teachers about. I promise I'm still a nice person though. I'm just a pain in the butt sometimes!

And yes, I need to make these phone calls to the school board even though it often seems like a waste of time. At least it puts me and my son on their radar.

It's important to me to show my son that advocating is hard, but if we want to see change, it needs to be done. If he can see that I am a strong advocate on his behalf, then he can hopefully channel that energy and become a strong self-advocate for himself one day.

So the moral of the story?

Don't give up. Advocate hard. Be a pain in the ass. Because your child is watching you and depending on you.

Other Advocacy Resources You'll Love

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Thursday, September 27, 2018

Free Printable Blank Visual Routine Chart for Kids

Build strong routines and independence with this free printable visual routine chart for kids that you can customize to fit your child's needs!

I really hate when I find a great free printable, but it has weird wording or includes something that we don't do as part of our routine. Sometimes it's nice to have a blank alternative so that I can create a custom routine myself.

Well, that's what this  free printable visual routine chart is for. It allows you to quickly create a custom routine and schedule for your child, allowing you more flexibility than some of the other premade visual routine charts that are offered on elsewhere on my blog.

Free printable visual routine chart for kids that's blank so you can customize it!

How to Use this Blank Visual Routine Chart

Here's what you'll need to use this blank routine chart:

This visual routine chart was designed for autistic, ADHD, and/or hyperlexic kids who benefit from using visual schedules and routines. Simply print, laminate, and hang somewhere that makes sense. You can either laminate it blank so you can use a dry erase marker to create custom routines on the fly or fill in the boxes on the chart before laminating it. Do what works best for you and your family!

The kids will enjoy checking off the items on their list with the dry erase marker. They don't have to go in the exact order list, which is why they are no numbers on this chart. Instead, it's more like a checklist. Then simply wipe it clean before the next use.

Download the Blank Visual Routine Chart for Kids

This free printable routine chart has five different colored options (white, blue, pink, yellow, and green) so that you can pick the one that fits your family and your child. Each blank template has room to write six steps.

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Wednesday, September 26, 2018

Free Printable School Morning Visual Routine Chart for Kids

Build strong school morning routines and independence with this free printable visual routine chart for kids!

I don't know about you, but school mornings are especially hectic around here. Both boys need lots of prompting and reminders about simple tasks like remembering to brush their teeth.

By using this free printable school morning routine chart, I am hoping the kids will learn to be more independent so that we can actually get out the door and to school on time.

Free printable school morning routine chart for kids

How to Use this Visual School Morning Routine Chart

Here's what you'll need to use your morning routine chart:

This visual routine chart was designed for autistic, ADHD, and/or hyperlexic kids who benefit from using visual schedules and routines. Simply print, laminate, and hang somewhere that makes sense. Personally I printed off two copies, one for each son, and hung them by our backdoor so they're visible when we are making the mad dash for school in the mornings.

The kids will enjoy checking off the items on their list with the dry erase marker. They don't have to go in the exact order list, which is why they are no numbers on this chart. Instead, it's more like a checklist. Then simply wipe it clean before the next use.

Download the School Morning Visual Routine Chart for Kids

This free printable routine chart has five different colored options (white, blue, pink, yellow, and green) and two types (one with making the bed and one without making the bed) so that you can pick the one that fits your family and your child. Simply print the page you need as there is no need to print all ten pages.

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Friday, September 14, 2018

Free Printable Morning Visual Routine Chart for Kids

Build strong morning routines and independence with this free printable visual routine chart for kids!

Mornings can be hectic around here, especially on a school day, but my boys still need constant reminders about different aspects of their morning routine. By using this free printable morning routine chart, I am hoping to build a strong morning routine without me having to give constant verbal reminders. And so far, it's been working great.


Free printable morning routine chart for kids

How to Use this Visual Morning Routine Chart

Here's what you'll need to use your morning routine chart:

This visual routine chart was designed for autistic, ADHD, and/or hyperlexic kids who benefit from using visual schedules and routines. Simply print, laminate, and hang somewhere that makes sense. Personally I printed off two copies, one for each son, and hung them on their whiteboards in their bedrooms.

The kids will enjoy checking off the items on their list with the dry erase marker. They don't have to go in the exact order list, which is why they are no numbers on this chart. Instead, it's more like a checklist. Then simply wipe it clean before the next use.

Download the Morning Visual Routine Chart for Kids

This free printable routine chart has five different colored options (white, blue, pink, yellow, and green) and two types (one with making the bed and one without making the bed) so that you can pick the one that fits your family and your child. Simply print the page you need as there is no need to print all ten pages.

Click here to subscribe
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Thursday, September 13, 2018

Free Social Stories About Death and Funerals

A collection of free social stories about death and going to a funeral. These free printable social stories are a great tool for helping your child understand and cope with the death of someone they know.

While a heavy topic to discuss, it is an important one to bring up because many kids struggle to understand what death means and struggle to cope with the loss of someone they know.

Using a social story to explain death and funerals is a great tool for autistic children.

I know we have relied on them over the years and they have been so helpful for both of my boys. Social stories explained to them who died, where the funeral was being held, what was expected of them at the funeral, etc. They were incredibly helpful!

I hope you find these free social stories about death and going to a funeral as helpful for your children as they have been for our family over the years.

Free printable and video social stories about death and funerals

Tips on Writing Social Stories About Death

Death can be a difficult concept for many kids to grasp, especially autistic kids. It is best to be concrete when describing the death of someone to your child. Keep the language simple and avoid metaphors.

I have outlined how to write social stories in general, but writing about grief and loss may require extra sensitivity and consideration. Here is a great list of tips on how to write social stories related to illness or death from Car Autism Roadmap. The video below also has lots of great tips on writing social stories on this difficult topic.


Free Printable Social Stories About Death and Social Stories About Going to a Funeral

The social stories below are a great starting point for helping your child understand and cope with someone's death.

However, every situation is different and may need special tweaks to the story. For example, you may have to travel for the funeral or you might be participating in the funeral in some way (like speaking, saying the eulogy, etc.). If that is the case, then use these free printable social stories as a starting point to create your own unique story.

1. Social Story for Dealing with the Death of a Grandparent from Megan Maguire on Teachers Pay Teachers

2. Mommy Loves Me: Editable Social Story About Death and Dying from The Gift of Gab on Teachers Pay Teachers

3. Going to a Memorial or Funeral Social Story from Autism Homeschool Mama

4. Funeral Social Story for Autism from Evan Autism Resources on Teachers Pay Teachers

5. Going to a Funeral Social Story from One Place for Special Needs

6. Going to a Wake Social Story from One Place for Special Needs

7. How to Behave at a Wake or Funeral Social Story from One Place for Special Needs

Video Social Story About Death

The video social story below is specific to the death of a grandma, but the words might be helpful for you if you need to adapt it to the death of a different family member.


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Where to Find Free Social Stories

How to Write Social Stories

Free Social Story Templates

Free printable and video social stories about death and funerals
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